Veterans, Dogs, CBS
Image Source: CBS News

Dogs are man’s best friend and sometimes it is hard to live without our best companions. Keeping a dog is even related to science and they could easily get attached to you. Dogs are also used in military and police to find a suspect or detect a bomb. Just, for example, retired Army Sgt. Carlos Cruz is totally depended on his dog who use to be there at his service named Hannah. After returning from his Afganistan expedition he was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder as back in Afghanistan his duty was to hunt for enemy explosive devices and his dog Hannah always helped him tracking the explosive devices.

Veterans, Dogs, CBS
Image Source: Purdue University photo/Rebecca Wilcox

Cruz conveyed in an interview with CBS News as he said, “It’s amazing what she does for me. I don’t even know how she knows half the time. It’s like an unspoken language, I guess you could say.” He took Hannah in his custody in January 2018 and he even says that he is very thankful to his little friend for her every day. According to the scientists, they think that there is more than told by the retired Sg. A team of scientists recently conducted a study in which they studied more than 100 service dogs at the Purdue University of Indiana. For the research, Cruz collected his saliva 3 times a day for a month to test his stress hormones.

He also used a wrist band to track his vitals and same for his dog Hannah and they’ll be tested again in next summers. Dr. Maggie O’Haire told CBS News, “I think there are people out there who question whether or not service dogs actually help and they are looking for numbers and science.” O’Haire leads the Organization for Human-Animal Interaction Research and Education which is a research group at Purdue as they are also contributing to the study.

Micky James
Micky, one of the associate writers at The News Recorder has been taking care of all the space related coverage. He loves to write about the latest happenings in space, and before joining The News Recoder, James was a part of the editorial board of a local magazine.